Tag Archives: Memories

The Truths You Find While Researching Genealogy

The family 1966

Growing up my parents didn’t talk much about our family history. I heard a few stories from my Mother but none whatsoever from my Dad. I didn’t get curious about my family until after my Mother died and by then it was too late to ask the questions I had.

I had always been told that my Mother and Dad had each been married before they themselves had gotten married. My Mother said she had been married twice before. She told me her first husband had died from typhoid fever and her second husband has killed in a house fire while she had gone out shopping.

Truth #1: My Mother married to Earl Joseph Wilson on September 4, 1936. My half-brother was born in April 1937. This is where the information stopped. However, after much research I discovered that Earl Joseph Wilson had served in WWII in the army, he also moved to Dayton Ohio after the war and he passed away there on December 23. 1993. So much for Typhoid Fever.                                                                                                  George C Liermans' Death

Truth #2: She married George C. Lierman on July 19, 1940. On May 14, 1948 George did indeed die in a house fire along with 1 of his step-sons. The newspaper article stated his wife Grace had gone to the store and the kerosene stove exploded shortly afterwards. No mention of my Mother. George and Grace were married in 1946 so apparently he and my Mother had been a divorce prior to that.

Truth #3: My maternal Grandfather’s second wife died February 4, 1948. In her obituary it lists her step-children, John P Smith; Raymond Smith; Mrs. Otto Claxton and Mrs. Ike Cook. My Aunt Mary was married to Otto so who was Mrs. Cook. Of course, it had to be my Mother. There was never a mention of her 3rd marriage the entire time I was growing up!

I had been told that my Dad had been married once before and he and his wife Mildred had 2 daughters. Mildred and the two young girls died of Scarlet Fever.

Dad Mildred 1 MLTruth #1: My Dad married Mildred Shockley November 20, 1937. He was 22 and Mildred was just 17. On February 28, 1938, 3 months after getting married my half-brother Benjamin was born. I never knew I had another brother as I only discovered this about 8 years ago! Benjamin died on May 12, 1938 from Pneumonia. Mildred died on June 12, 1938, also of Pneumonia.

 

Dad Mildred Loretta

Truth #2: In March 1944 he married Mildred McQuillen Young who had a 2-year-old daughter. They never had any children. They had to have gotten divorced because both were remarried in 1948. Mildred died on December 5, 1981 not of Scarlet Fever. The young girl died in 2008.

 

I will never know the reason behind my Mother not telling me the truth about their lives. Maybe it was just during that era it was frowned upon to be divorced or married more than once. I also wonder why I was never told about my baby brother who died so young. All I know is I am more determined than ever to leave behind an accurate account of my life, yes even the unflattering things, for my descendants.

Have you uncovered any “untruths” in your linage? I would love to hear about them.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

Advertisements

5 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Documentation, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Hughes, Marriage, Memories, Mistakes, Personal Stories, Research, Smith, Story telling, Truth, Uncategorized

This Is So Frustrating!

FrustratedHave you ever been frustrated trying to find information on a critical ancestor? I have. I am also surprised that I can find 10+ documents/sources on an ancestor who came to America in the early 1600’s but I can only find 3 on my Great Grandfather who was born February 14, 1853 in Hazel Hill, Missouri. Oh, but his wife, my Great Grandmother, has over 20 documents/sources!

I have been searching for information on Pleasant (Plesent) Smith for over 20 years. pleasant ml 2Here is what I have found thus far. He married Sarah Jane Page (McDowell, Farris/Parris) on April 13, 1882. She had been married twice before Pleasant and once after. My Grandfather, John Pleasant Smith was born September 8th, 1882 so apparently, she was pregnant before they got married. I have John’s Social Security Application and he states that Plesent and Sarah were his parents and it has their dates of birth. I also have a Census Record which I will explain about later.

I can find no birth or death records. In John’s 1920 Census he states his Father was born in Texas. I know this information can vary depending on who answered the door and gave the it. So, there is no proof of where he was born. In my baby book the date and place of birth was given as stated above but again no solid proof.

The legend or oral history passed down from my Mother was that Pleasant was a Creek Indian. He had deserted his tribe and married Sarah. Sometime after the marriage some of the tribesmen found him, killed him and dismembered his body. They then placed the parts on the railroad tracks, so it would appear the train ran over him. A gentleman found the body before the train came. This occurred sometime between 1882 and before 1894. My Mother also told me that some after Sarah married her last husband James Newhouse in 1894 that Sarah got a letter from the Creek Tribe addressed to Chief (she couldn’t remember the name). She said Sarah sent the letter back unopened. Does this prove that he was Creek Indian? I don’t think so.

census 2On Sarah’s marriage license to James it lists her last name Parris/Farres. So where is the name Smith? This brings me to the Census record I mentioned above. In the 1870 Census it has a Pleasant Parris working on the farm of Norman Wyckoff in Lincoln, Putnam, Missouri. He was 17 years old same as my Pleasant. The last name matches the marriage license. So, could it be that this is my Pleasant?

Does anyone have any wisdom, ideas or good advice of where I can go from here? No wonder my hair is turning white and I am getting black rings under my eyes.

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Creek Indian, Death, Documentation, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Marriage, Missouri, Native American, Page Family, Personal Stories, Pleasant Smith, Research, Sarah Jane Page, Story telling, Uncategorized

Are You Kidding Me?

confused-smileyI have been doing Genealogy for over 20 years. I am the first to confess that I am far from knowing everything about it and the processes to make those great discoveries. I have no problem when someone wants to share their knowledge with me, I do however mind if their “knowledge” has no basis and the person who shares it hasn’t even verified what they are passing along.

The Allens 1840Case in point. I am very proud of my maternal 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia “Milly” Loving Allen. She was a very strong woman who, at the age of 67 moved her large family from Cole County Missouri to Navarro, Tarrant County, Texas after the death of her husband in 1843. In my family tree on Ancestry I have 3 photos of Permelia, one of her, one of her and a daughter and one of her and her husband Thomas Allen taken in 1840.

I received a message from a descendent of Thomas & Permelia informing me that the photo could not be of my 4x Great Grandparents because photography had not been invented at that time! She proceeded to call me names and said it made her feel good to expose fakes like me!!! I was flabbergasted. I looked at her profile on Ancestry, she was about my age. Surely, she had seen photos taken during the Civil War and even before that.

CameraSo, I decided I would thank her for her comments and then educate her, in a nice way, about the invention of photography.

1814 – Joseph Niepce achieves first photographic image using an early device for projecting real-life imagery called a camera obscura.

1837 – Louis Daguerre’s first daguerreotype, an image that was fixed and did not fade and needed under thirty minutes of light exposure.

1840 – First American patent issued in photography to Alexander Wolcott for his camera.

1841 – William Henry Talbot patents the Calotype process, the first negative-positive process making possible the first multiple copies.

1843 – The first advertisement with a photograph is published in Philadelphia.

1851 – Frederick Scott Archer invented the Collodion process so that images required only two or three seconds of light exposure.

So, there were the means for people to have their photos taken or to take their own. I even discovered that the Chinese and Greek philosophers described the basic principles of optics and the camera in the 5th & 4th Centuries B.C.

So, my point is, if you run into something you are not 100% sure of, do a little research or ask questions first before confronting someone. Or, if you encounter someone like I did you can take the opportunity to share some much-needed knowledge with them.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

5 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Corrections, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, How-to, Missouri, Permelia Loving Allen, Personal Stories, Photography, Research, Texas, Uncategorized

A Man of Great Character

Dad 1955I grew up in a very dysfunctional home. The only stability in that home was my Dad. He was the person who influenced my life the most while growing up. He showed me unconditional love, even through all the craziness of my teen years. I never really appreciated him until after he was gone. In honor of this remarkable man, this blog is to celebrate his life on what would be his 102nd Birthday.

Benjamin Douglas “Doug” Hughes was born in Pettis County, Missouri, August 18, 1915. The day he was born his Uncle who, was blind, died. His parents named him after this uncle. He was the 8th of 11 children born to Charley and Virginia Bell (Hayes) Hughes. They lived on a farm in rural Lexington, Missouri, raising all their food, and raising cows and award-winning horses. During the Great Depression of the 1930’s they were fortunate enough to not suffer as others did because they were self-sustaining. They shared what they had with others in the community and I believe this is where my Dad developed his giving spirit!

My Dad worked his entire life. He worked on the farm, planting and caring for the vegetables and fruit trees. He tended and milked the cows and he helped his Dad train

Dad and his horse

their horses. In 1934-35 my Dad participated in the Civilian Conservation Corp implemented by President Roosevelt. He served in Lake Tahoe, California. Here he learned to work with wood and stone masonry. These skills helped him the rest of his life. After the CCC he worked as a coal miner, worked on the railroads, he was a butcher and for the last 19 years of his life he worked in the construction field.

He was married 3 times; the first was when he was 22 years old in 1937. He married Mildred Shockley and they had a son Benjamin Benjamin died at 2 months old from Typhoid. Mildred was placed in a sanitarium and died 3 weeks later from the same thing. My Dad wasdad, mildred, lola devastated. He married a second time in 1944 to Mildred McQuillen. She had a daughter name Loretta whom my Dad accepted as his own. They never had children and I don’t know what happened but they divorced sometime before 1948. The third time was my Mother, Emmajane Smith in 1948. My Mother had a son, Gordon and once again my Dad took him as his own. My Dad and Mother had known each other for over 10 years because my Dad’s youngest sister Margaret and my Mother were best friends! My sister Mary Leella was born in 1951 and I was born four years later.

We left Missouri when I was 11 months old and moved to Southern Arizona. My parents bought a house on a corner lot in a new subdivision just outside the Tucson City limits. My Dad took pride in the yard. He taught me all I know about plants and landscaping. I loved spending time doing yard work and helping him build things. He laid bricks for planters, he built a large trellis for the patio. He poured the cement for the patio, he even made the lawn furniture and picnic table. I just loved being with him. He was always ready and willing to help any of our neighbors with whatever they needed. Everyone liked and respected him.  When I was 12 years old my Mother had a mental breakdown and the next 7 years were pure hell! My Dad refused to have her committed and he took care of her even through our moves back to Missouri for 2 years then out to California for 5 years. He showed me that you don’t give up on people because the situation is not ideal. He showed strength of character and resolve that I have always admired.

In the Fall of 1973 my Dad went to the doctor for a cough that wouldn’t go away. After many tests and x-rays we were told he had lung cancer. He had surgery to remove his right lung then endured several rounds of chemo and radiation therapy. He lived for 9 months and he passed away at home on June 24, 1974. He was 58 years old. This was 43 years ago and I still think about him every day. I still strive to be the kind of woman, wife, mother and Grandmother that would make him proud. I know that I am proud to be his daughter!

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

4 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Arizona, Birthday, Charley Hughes, Dreams, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Hughes, Marriage, Memories, Peter Rucker, Uncategorized

Another Internet Surprise

computer-image-ort-hiOnce again, the internet, specifically Facebook has helped me to fill in some holes in my Family History. I wrote a blog ( tinyurl.com/y8c99wur  ) 3 years ago about my Aunt Nellie whose husband was murdered in Lexington Missouri in 1930. I had tried to do research before I wrote it but there wasn’t much information available. My sources were a newspaper article and the story told me by a cousin. Yesterday, I received                            a message on my Authors Facebook page and I was astounded!

The Great Grandson of the man, Irvan Menaugh who murdered my Uncle Virgil, sent meLexington MO Courthouse information about it and the trial. He told me stories he had heard from his Dad and from a Grandson of Irvan. He even took the time to give me the dates and the outcomes of the proceeding trails associated with the murder. There are still a lot of questions about the entire case, ones like “Why wasn’t Irvan convicted of this murder?”, “Where are the missing court records?” and “Was the presiding judge bribed with a land deal to find Irvan not guilty?” I plan on writing a new blog on this new information and maybe more facts can be found.

I have read a lot of arguments between Genealogists about whether to allow our Family Trees to be seen by the public and to limit the information we use in our Blogs or to make it all public. I understand both sides, the pros and cons etc. All I know is several times, because of a Blog I have received vital pieces of information I needed to fill in the gaps. 20 years ago, when I first started researching my Family History this could never happen. I would have never known this kind gentleman even existed. My advice is to use the internet to its fullest extent, reaching out to others with any information you may have or to ask others if they have additional information that could help in your research. All I know is I am so thankful to the generous Genealogy Community.

Have you had someone contact you with much need information about an Ancestor because of the internet?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also                              connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ancestry, Death, Facebook, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Hughes, Lexington MO, Memories, Missouri, Personal Stories, Research, Story telling, Uncategorized

Including Family Traditions

In Genealogy circles the term “traditions” means oral accounts of usually unsubstantiated stories of our family history. An example of this is my Great Grandfather Pleasant Smith. According to the information written in my baby book he was born on February 14, 1853 in Hazel Hill, Johnson County, Missouri. I have not been able to find any documentation to prove this other than this entry. He married Sarah Jane Page on April 13, 1882 in Lafayette County, Missouri. I have found this record. My Grandfather, John Pleasant Smith was born September 8, 1882. I have records for this.  My Great Grandmother Sarah married James Newhouse on February 27, 1894. I have this record. What happened to Pleasant Smith? There is no record of him after the birth of his son. Sometime between this and Sarah’s new marriage he disappeared.

The Tradition in our family is that he was a Creek Indian in a high position in the tribe. He deserted the tribe and lived in hiding from them. Sometime after my Grandfather was born members of that tribe found him, murdered him, cut him into pieces and placed his remains on the railroad track. They did this shortly before the train was to come by. Someone found his body before the train came. Supposedly a few years after this occurred Sarah received a letter addressed to Pleasant which included the name of the position he held among the tribe. She never opened the letter and sent it back to the sender.

I have no proof that this Tradition ever happened. So, the question is, do I include this in my Family History or just pass it on orally like it was given to me? I have decided that, although I love genealogy and enjoy the research it entails, I need to be honest with myself that no one else in my immediate family has any interest (yet) in it. I often wonder if this tradition may pass away with me.

As a result, I am now including all the family traditions I have heard of. I write out the story as completely as I can and then include all documentation I have on this particular person. I make sure that anyone reading it will understand that further research needs to be done to make it a “fact”. Who knows, many years from now one of my Grandchildren may discover proof of this and my recording the story helped them find it!

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

5 Comments

Filed under Ancestry, Brick Walls, Creek Indian, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, Hints, Memories, Missouri, Personal Stories, Pleasant Smith, Research, Sarah Jane Page, Story telling, Uncategorized

52 Ancestors Week #9 – Mary Leella Hughes – Close to Home

Mom, Dad, Bro & SisMary Leella “Le” Hughes was born on February 17, 1951 in Lexington, Missouri. She was the first child of Douglas and Emmajane (Smith) Hughes.  Le is my older and only sister and although our relationship was very rocky she was always the closest person to me. Because of this relationship it is very difficult to write about her. Try as I might, I cannot remember one good thing about her.

Me, Gordon, Le

Me, Gordon, Le

For the first four years of her life she was spoiled by everyone. We have an older brother, Gordon, who was fourteen years older than Le. He overindulged her. When I came along she was jealous, she was no longer the center of everyone’s world.

truckMy very first memory was when I was three years old. My maternal Uncle and his family had come to Arizona from Missouri for a visit. Le, three of my cousins and I were playing in the back of my Dad’s 1953 Ford pickup truck. To be honest, no one liked her because she was extremely mean, so the cousins were avoiding her and were just chasing me around the bed of the truck. Le got mad, picked me up and threw me over the edge of the truck. I landed on a 2×4 board that lined the driveway. My right arm was broken in three places, including having my wrist bone come through my skin! My Dad and Uncle rushed me to the doctor and he set my arm and put on a cast. I was so small that I used a regular sized bandana as a sling. Le never got in trouble.

1999

This was the first of many, many incidents that happened not only throughout our childhood but on into adulthood. Le never married or had children and she lived with our Mother until her death in 1999. Le had diabetes and had to have both of her legs amputated just below her knees. After Mother’s death she had to move into a nursing home. Le died on September 22, 2012 at the age of 61.

I struggle with writing about both my sister and my Mother, because of the broken relationships I had with them. Also, so many things happened during my childhood that sounds so unbelievable, I hesitate to write about them. So the question is how much should I write about them since there isn’t much nice to say. How much truth is too much truth? What does the future generations really need to know? So much about writing about my sister brings many things a little “to close to home”.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

5 Comments

Filed under #52ancestors, Ancestry, Arizona, Family History, Genealogy, Home, Memories, Missouri