Category Archives: Revolutionary War

Revolutionary War Bateau Boats Made By The Rucker’s

Anthony and Benjamin Rucker where the sons of John and Susannah (Phillips) Rucker of Rucker CrestOrange County Virginia. Benjamin born in 1726 became a lawyer, justice of the peace, a vestryman at St. Matthews Church, trustee of Warminster Academy, a member of the Amherst County Committee of Safety, and a Captain in the Revolutionary War. Anthony born in 1728 was also a Revolutionary War Captain, as well as Amherst’s Commissioner of Provision Law in 1781 and Tobacco Inspector in 1792. 

The fact that the Rucker’s were tobacco farmers prompted Benjamin and Anthony to try Batteau boatto figure an easier way to move the harvested tobacco down the James River to Richmond.  Sometime in 1774 the Rucker Brothers invented a flat-bottomed boat called a Bateau. It has not been proved as to whether it was just Anthony or if the two brothers worked together. The first Bateau was launched in April 1775. The earliest known reference to the Bateau comes from Thomas Jefferson’s account book, dated April 19, 1775. Jefferson made notes in his account book describing this new river boat in 1775: “Rucker’s bateau is 50 f. long 4 f. wide in the bottom & 6 f. wide at the top. she carries ll.hhds. & draws 13 ½ water.”

James River RuckersThe Bateaus where used by the Continental Army. Bateaus were used to move troops, munitions and supplies on the shallow inland rivers during the Revolutionary War. They were carefully built craft as they were often mentioned as being built by a boat builder or “ship’s carpenter.” This evidence infers that the crafts known as “James River Bateaus” were strong, shallow-drafted vessels. They were a valuable military asset and were considered a major loss if captured by the enemy. These boats were used until around 1850.

There is a James River Bateau Festival held every year in Lynchburg VA. They celebrate the Rucker’s and their contribution to the early Transport for the tobacco industry and the Revolutionary War. They launch replica Bateaus and travel down the James River to Maiden’s Landing.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Bateau Boats, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Revolutionary War, Rucker's, Uncategorized, Virginia

52 Ancestors, Week #11 – Thomas Lee Divine – Luck of the Irish

Thomas Divine back tombstoneThomas Lee Divine is my maternal 4th Great Grandfather. He was born on February 21 1748 in Dublin, Ireland. At the age of 17 he made the decision to start a new life in America. He arrived in Kent County Delaware in 1765.  He soon found his new adopted country was in great turmoil, most of his fellow citizens wanted desperately to break away from England and begin a new, more Democratic Country.

Thomas Divine letter

When the Revolutionary War broke out Thomas enlisted as a private in the year seventeen hundred and seventy-six under Captain Gray in the Continental Line in Kent County in the State of Delaware and served for six years until shortly after the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown and was then honorably discharged. He was in the Battle of Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth and he was at the siege of Yorktown. Thomas was wounded by a cannon-ball on the side of the left leg above the ankle in a skirmish with the British when they fired across a small lake or pond but he continued to fight and to serve once his wounds were healed.

In 1782 he married Miss Jemima Dill at the house of Esgr Calhoun that was located within one mile of Black swamp-causeway in the county of Kent and State of Delaware. They lost their first four children to miscarriages but went on to have 6 more children, 3 boys and 3 girls. Prior to 1790 Thomas moved his growing family to Spartanburg, South Carolina.

After moving to South Carolina on the waters of Pacolit River in the Greenville District, the house they were living in burned to the ground and they had to start all over again, building a new home and getting new furnishings. Over the next several years he expanded his lands and crops and provided a very good life for his family.

church_3_945_334_c1In 1825 Thomas moved his family to McMinn County Tennessee. In 1834 on land given by Thomas the Big Creek Baptist Church was constituted. He also furnished the land for the cemetery, which is up the hill from the church.

Thomas Divine tombstone

Thomas Divine died on the twentieth day of June, eighteen hundred and forty at the age of ninety years old.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under #52ancestors, Ancestry, Delaware, Family History, Genealogy, Ireland, Revolutionary War, South Carolina, Tennessee

52 Ancestors #7 -For the Love of his wife –John Parrott

Parrottsville TnMy 3rd Great Grandfather, John Parrott was born in 1740 in Toms Brook, Shenandoah, Virginia to Frederick and Barbara (Edwards) Parrott. He was the oldest of 11 children. In 1761 he married Catherine Meyers. He and Catherine had seven children. In 1769 they moved their family to Tennessee where he founded the town of Parrottsville. (It is currently the third oldest town in that State)

When the Revolutionary War broke out all of his younger brothers joined the fight. It wasn’t until July 4 1777 that John enlisted as a private in Colonel William Grayson’s Virginia Regiment. He would have been 37 at the time of his enlistment, comparatively old for a soldier in those days. His age probably accounts for why he did not enlist earlier when his brothers did. It was undoubtedly a sacrifice for him to serve, for he left a wife of 17 years and a large family behind.

John’s regiment was one of sixteen organized by a congressional resolution in Congress in December 1777. Four of the sixteen units were composed largely of Virginians. John’s commander, William Grayson, had been assistant secretary and aide-de-camp to George Washington at the time he was put in command of his regiment. John was assigned to Captain Thomas Triplett’s company. By April 1779, the regiment, significantly reduced in size due to a smallpox epidemic, merged with Colonel Nathaniel Gist’s regiment, where John served under the command of Captain Joseph Smith.

The entire Parrott family was very Patriotic. That is why it was a shock that on August 19, 1779 John deserted his regiment after serving only 14 months of his three-year commitment. It was not uncommon during the Revolutionary War for soldiers to leave their troops for family emergencies. John deserted because the love of his life was gravely ill. He cared for Catherine until her death in 1781. Within a few months John married Louisa Bean. Together they had 5 children, the youngest one being Catherine my 3rd Great Grandmother. Catherine was named for John’s first wife.

John Parrott DAR

John Parrott HSAlthough John deserted his responsibility to the War he was still honored with a commemorative marker at his gravesite by the Daughters of the American Revolution. The marker that was placed there in 1783 still remains today. It is speculated that this was because he only deserted for the love of his wife and not because he didn’t believe in the cause.
I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: http://tinyurl.com/Your-Family-History and http://tinyurl.com/Genealogy-Research-Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under #52ancestors, Ancestry, Family History, Genealogy, John Parrott, Revolutionary War, Tennessee

Please Define Famous

FamousIn our search for our Ancestors we always experience that excited anticipation of possibly discovering that one famous person in our lineage. Finding someone who accomplished some great feat or invented something used by millions or who became President or who was an outlaw can bring color and excitement to our trees. When you gather together with other Genealogists you would now have something interesting to tell. Talking with family about these persons may peak their interest in their own history and of those who came before them.  I just wonder, How do we define “Famous”?

Webster’s dictionary defines it this way “known or recognized by very many people: having fame”.

In today’s society the term fame or being famous is applied to anyone who can get themselves in front of a TV camera, or across the internet regardless of the reason. Most are just famous for being famous, really not earning the “title” by doing anything worthwhile.  So I just wonder by what standard we measure those we deem famous in our own families.

Colby Rucker sign

To me, my 4th Great Grandfather Colby Rucker who fought in the Revolutionary war should be called famous. He volunteered to fight at the age of 17, defying his father in doing so and even after he was captured and imprisoned by the British, upon his escape he returned to fight till the end of the war. I JamestownFortconsider my 9th Great Grandfather  William Powell famous because he came to America, Jamestown Virginia to be exact, in 1609. He survived the massacre of 1622 but was killed in 1623. Regardless of how some may feel about what happened once immigrants came and forcibly took over this country, he was still brave to come to this strange land, far from all he knew. I believe my 4th Great Grandmother, Permelia Loving Permelia Loving Allen 2Allen was famous. At the age of 66 she became a widow, after 47 years of marriage.  4 years later after her husband’s estate was settled at the age of 70 she personally lead a group of settlers from Cole County Missouri to Tarrant County Texas. Included in this group were 8 of her 10 children and their families. She was one of the first women to own land in this county and she donated land for the Mount Gilead Baptist Church to be built. This remarkable woman witnessed the Revolutionary War, the War of 1812 and the Civil War and she died in her 92nd year.

These ordinary people who did extraordinary things are more “famous” in my eyes than some of the other “famous” people in my trees.  These are the stories I want to tell, the ones I am most proud of. Maybe we should rethink our definition of “Famous”. My new definition would be: “Those ordinary individuals, who through their own convictions succeeded to accomplish remarkable things that very few others are aware of”.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available at Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Famous, Genealogy, Jamestown Colony, Revolutionary War, Texas

Zane Grey:  Baseball Player, Dentist, Writer…..Genealogist?

 

Superstition Mount ianMesa Arizona is only 1,126 feet above sea level. As a result our summers can sometimes be unbearable. It has been known to reach temperatures of up to 122 degrees with it reaching 115+ for weeks at a time. Although we are having a “mild” summer this year, heat is heat and the urge to escape can be overwhelming.

My husband and I decided to make the hour trip north to Payson, elevation 5000 feet. Here their daytime highs are our night time lows. We just wanted to get away and explore a city that we didn’t know much about. We did know that the famous author of Western Novels, Zane Grey (1872-1939), had a cabin just outside the city where he would spend 3 months a year hunting and writing. His original cabin burned down in a forest fire in 1990, but the Rim Country Museum raised the money to build an exact replica on their property. So the decision was made to make a quick stop to see the cabin.

Payson is a small, quaint town. It is situated in the Tonto National Forest and has everything an Payson Arizonaoutdoors person would love. I fell in love with the beauty of the place. Pine trees, willow trees, green grass and flowers were everywhere. Remember, I live in the Desert with cactus, mesquite trees, and dirt so this was a treat. We easily found the Rim Country Museum and the cabin. We paid our admission and were lead by a very nice woman up to the cabin door. Once inside she told us the history of how Zane had come to Arizona back in 1905 and what happened during the years that he continued to come back. She spoke about the books he had written of the old west and the Rim Country. During his lifetime he had written over 90 books! Then she showed us a copy of the very first book he ever wrote. It was titled “Betty Zane” and it wasn’t about the Wild West or his adventures or about fishing. It was a historical account of his family, lead by Colonel Ebenezer Zane, his Great Grandfather and them being the first to pioneer a town in 1769 high above the Ohio River at a point near Wheeling Creek. I was immediately hooked.

Payson 034Growing up, only boys read Zane Grey books. I never really liked reading Westerns and I suppose it was because I was raised in the area most of these types of books are written about. I was surprised to find that Zane’s first attempt at writing was of his own family’s history. In it he gives detailed accounts of their travels, their struggles, their loves, and their triumphs. He draws you into their involvement in the Revolutionary War and enthralls you with the story of his Great Grand Aunt Betty Zane who, as a young girl, witnessed the death of her father during a Revolutionary War battle against the Indians who sided with the British at Fort Henry. In spite of her grief and fears she made her way through the enemies forces and retrieved some much needed black gunpowder and brought it safely back to the Fort.

Although it is said that most of what he wrote concerning his family was taken from oral traditions Elizabeth_Zanepassed down through the family, it has since been proven that almost ever account is indeed true.  What I want to take from this book and his style of writing is how he doesn’t just “tell the story”. He describes the scenery and the smells to such an extent that you feel you are there. It is so much more than dates and facts; it is the incredible story of their lives.

I am now more determined than ever to not just remember my Ancestors, but to find their stories and write them in a way that will transport future generations back to the time of those who have gone before.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Arizona, Family History, Family Search, Genealogy, History, Revolutionary War, Zane Grey

Star Wars versus the Revolutionary War-Engaging the Next Generation

Throughout the month of May people are posting Blogs entitled “Military Memories” to honor their Ancestors who fought in the various Wars. I have been so moved by all the accounts of bravery, courage and sacrifice of so many of them. I have always loved History so reading these is enjoyable for me. I guess you could say that I have a hard time believing that some people just do not find History to be interesting or exciting.

Last week my youngest Grandson Banon, who is 7 years old and in the first grade, asked me why I was crying while looking at my computer. I told him I was reading a Blog about a young man who was killed in a War and that it was sad.  He responded “Grandma, I don’t like History, it’s so boring!” I was mortified! How could a Grandson of mine feel this way? I asked him why he thought it was boring and he said “Because all those people are dead!” Oh my…where did I go wrong?

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As the day wore on I started thinking about what he had said about History being boring.  Then it hit me. I need to make it personal for him! So I pulled out the binders I had made for my older Grandkids a few years ago and called him over to me. Now he is a diehard Star Wars fan. He knows every character, every weapon, and every mode of transportation by name. This gave me the idea to make a correlation between Star Wars and the Revolutionary War. Before you think that I have totally lost it, please hear me out. I asked him what it was about the fighting in Star Wars that he liked. He then rattled off his reasons. I then asked him if he would like to hear about a real war where, just like Anakin, people fought to make their families free from a Ruler. He took the bait.

After explaining “briefly” about why America went to war with Britain, I started telling him about the different weapons that were used and how they had used horses and wagons for transportation. I then told him about the way they dressed.…the Red Coats vs. the Blue Coats. Then I finally took one of the binders and showed it to him. I saw a spark appear in his eyes! You see, 5 years ago when my oldest Grand Daughter started High School she told me that EBAY and Binders 001they were going to learn about the Revolutionary War in History Class. I told her we had Ancestors who fought in the War and she got excited. So I put together 3 binders with all the information I could find about the Soldiers, the company they fought with, who they fought under and named the Battles they participated in. I used maps and pictures of the Historic places. I also included a linage from that Ancestor to me. She loved them and took them to school. She got an A+ when she did her presentation on the War. I had made it personal to her and she was inspired to do her own research. Over the last few years 2 more Grandchildren have used the binders and since then I have made several more. So I made it personal for Banon and he was enthralled. He asked so many questions he actually wore me out. His teacher even told my daughter that all he talked about since then was those binders and we had to take them to school for the teacher and his class to see.

EBAY and Binders 030I have also put together binders for Ancestors who fought in the Civil War, the War of 1812, WWI and WWII. I even have a few binders about our First Ancestors that came to America. I intend to show these to Banon and his brother over the summer.

Sometimes we have to just go that extra mile to engage the younger generation in learning about History and their Genealogy. If we can start them young then they will hopefully develop an interest and excitement in finding their Ancestors and where they came from. Hopefully igniting that spark of curiosity in him will eventually burn with the same kind of passion for Genealogy and History that I have. After all, isn’t one of our goals as a Family Historian to be able to pass on what we have discovered to the generations that come after us?

 

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

 

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May 18, 2014 · 2:57 pm