PART 8: My Mother was Superstitious – A Month of Tales from the Dark Side

Unlucky 13I thought I would spend this month leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my Mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs.  I will post a blog every Friday and Tuesday and I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

My Mom was a Triskaidekaphobe. What is that you ask? It is the “Fear of the number 13”. If you have been following this series of Blogs about my life with a Mother who was plagued with Superstitions, you know that she several “Fears of” things. Some had been passed down to her through her Ancestors and some she just developed on her own. I have no idea where she got this particular Superstition. All I know is this fear made life a little difficult.

This fear of the number 13 was pretty well ingrained in my Mom.  If we went to the grocery store and her purchases came toStairs a total that had the number 13 in it she had to either buy one more item or put one back. If we went into a building and we had to take the stairs to another floor she would stand at the foot of the stairs and count the steps before walking up them. If there were 13 steps we had to take the elevator or leave. She would not do business with any store that was located on 13th street or one that had the number 13 in their address. When my Dad built the enclosure for our patio he used long 2×6’s horizontally placed around the cement area. When he was finished my Mom came outside to see it and after looking at it for a few minutes told him he had to either add one more 2×6 or take one away from the one side. Why? Because there were 13 boards. She also had the habit of staying in bed on whichever day the 13th of the month landed on.

Mary aged 10

Mary aged 10

I learned early on that I was not my Mom’s favorite child. She never paid much attention to me and was always harder on me than she was my older sister. There was none of this “Isn’t she cute, she’s the baby of the family”. Looking back now I can assume it probably had a lot to do with the fact that I was born on the 13th of January. Not only that, but my first and last names have a total of 13 letters in them. Growing up I do not remember ever celebrating my birthday at home on the 13th. It was always the day before or after. My Mom had imparted a lot of her fears unto my sister, Mary. The number 13 happened to be one of them. Mary loved parties, especially birthday parties. She would throw a tantrum because she didn’t receive any gifts so my Mom would go out and buy her something. Mary knew that the chances of me ever having a birthday party were slim because of the date so she thought she would try having one on a different date. My 6th birthday had fallen on Friday the 13th that year! So not only was the party planned for a different date, but it was in an entirely different month as well. When I was 6 years old my sister threw me a 7th year birthday party on June 10th. The problem was she forgot to inform my parents about the party and to make things worse my brother was home on leave from the Air Force! So at 2 pm the doorbell rang and there stood the 4 kids from next door standing there all dressed up, each with a gift in their hands. My brother invited them in, he had no clue what Birthday Cakewas going on. Next thing he knew the doorbell was ringing again and in came more kids. When Mary told him and Mom what was going on they were both upset but didn’t want to spoil the time for the kids that had come to the “party”. As my brother went to the grocery store, my Mom pulled down the pin-the-tail on the donkey game and we started playing games. When my brother returned there were prizes for the games, ice cream, cake and even a gift for me. Mary decided to have a talent contest. The winning prize was a large chocolate candy bar. Since she was not only a participant in the contest but the only judge she won and got the candy! Even though it wasn’t really my birthday, I had a great time. It was the first and only birthday party I had until I became an adult.

I have always loved the number 13. After all it is my birth date, how can that be unlucky?

Here are some more Superstitions that my Mother had:

Ivy covered homeIvy growing on a house protects the inhabitants from witchcraft and evil.

Cover your mouth when you yawn, or your soul can go out of your body along with the yawn.                                               Yawning

RosemaryRosemary planted by the doorstep will keep witches away.

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

Come back on Friday for the last installment of “My Mothers Superstitious – Tales from the Dark Side.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Genealogy, Halloween, Superstitions

Part 7: My Mother’s Great Grandma was Superstitious–A Month of Tales from the Dark Side

superstitions-of-moonI thought I would spend this month leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my Mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs.  I will post a blog every Friday and Tuesday and I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

Elizabeth Marsh was my Mothers Great Grandmother. She was born 31 December 1841 in Chillicothe Missouri. Elizabeth was a religious woman, attending Church every Sunday and reading her Bible daily. She love reading all the accounts in the Old Testament and she would tell not only Garden of edenher children but the other children in the surrounding areas the stories that she found there. Her favorite one was about Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. We all know the account of how God created man, then from Adams rib He created woman. He set the two of them in this perfect Garden and told them they could eat from any tree in the garden except from “the tree of the knowledge of good and evil”. This Garden was perfect and they wanted for nothing. One day Satan took the shape of a serpent (snake) and tempted Eve with the fruit from the one forbidden tree. Satan told her that she could eat from fruit and she would not die but instead she would become like God and have great knowledge. She then ate from the fruit and she did not die. She then took the fruit to Adam and told him to eat from it also and he did. When God found out what they had done he banished them from the Garden. Elizabeth came to believe that Satan inhabited ALL snakes and she was afraid of them. She seldom ventured far from home on foot for fear of encountering one.

entrance to parkElizabeth passed her fear of snakes down to her children and they in turn passed it down to their children and so on. My Mom was raised in Missouri and she knew about all the types of snakes that lived there and where they were most likely to live. She avoided any place where she thought a snake may be. When we moved to Arizona my Mom found herself with a new dilemma. She did not know any of the species of snakes that dwelled in the Desert and she had no idea where they may hide. I remember once when we had relatives visiting us we took them on a cookout and hike in the Saguaro National Forest. Just so you know this is not a typical Saguaro National ParkForest with tall trees, it is filled with hundred year old Saguaro cacti. Some of these cacti grow to be 40-60 feet tall and can have up to 25 “arms” on it. While we were hiking up a hill, surrounded by beautiful cactus and Desert plants my Mom decided to kick over a rock. Nestled beneath this rock was a snake, all coiled up trying to sleep. My Mom took off running the opposite direction and didn’t stop until she got to our car. She then got inside and locked the doors. When we all finally reached the car it took a while before my Dad could convince her to come out. When she did she would only sit on the hood of the car! She tried to talk my Dad and my Uncles to go find the snake and kill it, but all they did was laugh.

A Lethal Mojave Rattlesnake Against a Stucco WallWe lived in a housing community just outside the Tucson City limits and the development was surrounded on 3 sides by Desert. A few years after this experience, early on a summer morning, I was taking a basket full of laundry out to hang on the clothes line. When I opened our back door and stepped outside I saw that there was a pretty large snake crawling along the wall of the house. I dropped the basket and jumped back inside, slamming the door. When my Mom found out about the snake she was hysterical. She started yelling that Satan was in that snake and we had to kill it. I was 6 years old at the time and my sister was 10 so we were not going to be much help in the “snake killing” department. My Dad was at work, as was every other man in our neighborhood. So my Mom devised a plan. I was to wait by the back door and wait for her to whistle. She was going to go out the front door, go into the shed and get a hoe and sneak up on the snake from behind.I was to open the back door and jump out and scream to get the snakes attention so that Satan would not see her coming at him. So it began…one…two…three…whistle…jump out…scream…my Mom began hitting the snake with the hoe. She was crying and hitting and crying and hitting and she didn’t stop until there was only a few recognizable pieces of the snake left. She then dropped the hoe, marched inside, crawled in bed and stayed there. When my Dad got home and he saw what was left of the snake he just shook his head, told us to get in the car and we went to McDonalds for dinner. My Mom finally emerged from her bedroom two days later and by then the snake parts had been disposed of. She had another “episode” when she found out the snake had been a rattlesnake but she got over it much quicker. From that day on until we sold the house and moved, which was 5 years, my Mom never went out the back door again. Up until she died at the age of 80 years old she would remind us every chance she got that “Satan was in all snakes and it was out duty to kill them.”

BTW: I have never killed a snake in my life and in fact I bought my Grandsons an Albino Corn snake for a pet!

Here are some more Superstitions that my Mother had:

visitor knocking on the doorIf you drop a fork you will be having company

Lift your feet up when driving over railroad tracks for good luckDriving over RR tracks

itchy feet

If the bottom of your right foot itches, you are going to take a trip or walk in a new place

 

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

Come back on Tuesday for the next installment of “My Mothers Superstitions – Tales from the Dark Side.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Asylum, Family History, Genealogy, Halloween, Snakes, Superstitions

Part 6: My Mother was Superstitious–A Month of Tales from the Dark Side

Superstition 2 ImageI thought I would spend this month leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my Mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs.  I will post a blog every Friday and Tuesday and I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

Superstition #6 -A Friday night’s dream on a Saturday told will always come true no matter how old!”

Aunt Nellie

Aunt Nellie

In 1966 while we were living in Tucson Arizona my Dad received a phone call that one of his twin sisters, Nellie, had had a heart attack. Apparently it was a bad one and they didn’t expect her to live more than a couple of weeks. It was a Thursday evening and the decision was made to leave the 1966 Seattlenext morning and drive to Seattle Washington as quickly as possible. Because of the urgency my parents decided to drive straight through with them taking turns driving. The next morning we left before the sun came out and started the long 1650 mile one way trip.

Mary, Dad, Mom & me!

Mary, Dad, Mom & me!

We headed toward Los Angeles so we could take Highway 5 straight up to Washington. My Dad and Mom took turns driving for 8 hours each. First my Dad drove while my Mom slept then my Mom drove so my Dad could sleep and so forth. My sister and I sat in the back seat reading, playing games, watching the scenery and sleeping. About 10 pm that Friday evening my Mom woke up and took the wheel and my Dad found a comfortable way to recline and he was soon asleep. My sister and I also fell asleep. It was hard to stay asleep because my Mom had a horrible habit of whistling. It was never a tune, just a sound and it was never loud enough to actually hear it, but it was loud enough to be annoying. In the quiet of the car it made sleeping next to impossible, at least for me.

I guess I finally did fall asleep at some point because all of a sudden we were all 3 jarred from our slumber by a horrifying Sexton Mountain passscream. The sun was just coming up over the Western Mountain illuminating the gorgeous pine trees and making the sky appear red. Of course it was hard to enjoy these beauties because there was my Mom, sitting in the front driver’s seat, both hands on the wheel, holding it so tightly her knuckles were white. She had brought the vehicle to a complete stop and she had a look of terror on her face like none I had ever seen before. She just sat there screaming to the top of her lungs. My Dad tried everything to try to calm her down and he even tried prying her hands from the wheel. Nothing helped. Looking behind us there was a line of cars and trucks piling up for miles and some of them were honking their horns. Remember this was the mid 60’s, there was only a one lane road going in both directions. There were no passing lanes. My Dad climbed out of the car, walked around to the driver’s side, opened the door and literally picked my Mom up off the seat. He had to yell at her to get her to turn loose of the wheel. Finally, he was able to carry her around to the passenger seat and put her in the car. He then reached into the glove box and pulled out a large handkerchief and made a blindfold out of it. Once he made sure it was securely in place he then got in the car and he drove off. It still took about 10 minutes for my Mom to quit screaming. All my sister and I could do was to hold our hands over our ears.

Grants Pass RoadWhen we got to the next town we stopped at a rest area and my Dad had us all get out of the car. After eating sandwiches for breakfast my sister finally ask “What happened?”  My Mom just shook her head and looked pathetically at my Dad. He told us that Mom had always been afraid of heights and never liked driving through any Mountains. That night we had driven over the Sexton Mountain Pass just north of Grants Pass Oregon which was about 2000 in elevation. My Mom had driven all night through Mountainous roads but because of the darkness she didn’t realize it. Once the sun started to come up she could see where she was driving and panicked.  My Dad then told us that this is not the only thing that had frightened my Mom. Apparently about a month ago, on a Friday night, she had a dream that she was driving down a foggy road and she ended up having a bad accident and she lost her legs. She then told my Dad about the dream the next day. This is where the Superstition comes in. Mom believed ”A Friday night’s dream on a Saturday told will always come true no matter how old!” She was convinced that she was going to have an accident and lose her legs. It didn’t matter that in her dream she was driving alone and on a flat road, she had told her Friday night dream on a Saturday so she was doomed! From then on, all the way to Seattle and then all the way back home again, my Dad drove. We did stop for the night on the way back so we could rest. My Mom rode the entire rest of the trip with the blindfold on.

My Aunt Nellie did get better and went on to live a long and happy life!

Here are some more Superstitions that my Mother had:

If you lose an eyelash make a wish then blow it away  Lose an eyelash

bite your tongueIf you bite your tongue while eating, it is because you have recently told a lie

It is bad luck to open an umbrella insideopening an umbrella inside

 

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

Come back on Friday for the next installment of “My Mothers Superstitions – Tales from the Dark Side.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Dreams, Family History, Genealogy, Halloween, Seattle, Traveling

Something to Ponder Next Time You Get Stuck in Your Family History

Pondering

Yesterday my husband and I went to the Arizona State Fair. Each year one of their biggest attractions is the Native American Dancers that perform throughout the day. I enjoy taking photos of the colorful costumes and of their dancing. Growing up my Mother had told me that I was part Creek Indian. Her SONY DSCGrandfather, Pleasant Smith, was supposed to have been a full-blooded Creek. I have never been able to prove or disprove this as he is one of my solid brick walls. I believe my interest and appreciation for Indian Culture comes from the hope that maybe I am Creek.

SONY DSCThe dancers who performed at the fair were all from tribes here in Arizona. One was Navajo, one was Hopi SONY DSCand one was Zuni. They sang, beat the drums, played the flute and danced. It was wonderful! After the performance we went to talk with the young men and during the course of the conversation the Navajo, Lane Jensen, mentioned that his Ancestors had all been Hoop Dancers. Ancestors? Did I hear him correctly, Ancestors? This is not a word that can just be used lightly around a Genealogist. I began asking him questions explaining that I am a Genealogist and I write a blog. He was more than happy to answer my questions.

SONY DSCThe Navajo Nation consists of about 90 “Clans”. When a Navajo baby is born, he or she belongs to the clan of the mother. The clan names always passes on to the next generation through the Mother. Whenever a young man or woman gets married they are not allowed to marry anyone within their Mothers Clan. This is also the line that they trace their Genealogy through, the maternal Clan line. Whenever a Navajo meets another Navajo they always include an introduction of their clans. They would say they were born to (their Mothers Clan name) and that they were born for (their Fathers Clan name). This way another Navajo would precisely know who they are.

SONY DSC

So why do I say this is something to ponder when you find yourself “stuck” or hitting a brick wall? Well according to Lane, all people within a Clan are related. In the Navajo way, two Navajos of the same clan, meeting for the first time, will refer to each other as “brother” or “sister”. Navajos that are cousins to each other in the American sense, think of each other as “brother” or “sister” in the Navajo sense. Father’s and Mother’s cousins in the American way are thought of as aunts and uncles in the Navajo way. Grandparent’s brothers and sisters in the American way are thought of as Grandmas and Grandpas in the Navajo way. So let’s say in my case my Grandfather had 10 siblings so therefore I would have 4 more Grandmas and 6 more Grandpas in my line. This would be so confusing.  Then add in all the “Brothers”, “Sisters”, “Aunts” and “Uncles” and your Family Tree would jump by hundreds.

Although this concept is actually very wonderful because this way of life makes everyone related and they all have the responsibility to take care of one another, to a Genealogist this way of labeling family could become a nightmare! So the next time you get stuck just remember the Navajo and how much more difficult your tree could be.

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Brick Walls, Family History, Genealogy, Native American

Part 5: My Mother’s Great Grandfather was Superstitious –A Month of Tales from the Dark Side

superstition imageI thought I would spend this month leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my Mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs.  I will post a blog every Friday and Tuesday and I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

James D. McGowan born in 1837 was a first Generation American. His father Francis McGowan was born and raised in Dublin County, Ireland. Francis immigrated to America in 1811 bringing with him his love of his mother land and his Irish superstitions. Growing up James and his 8 siblings heard the stories and legends of Ireland.

James married Lucy Reavis in 1856 and started a family. He didn’t realize how many of those old superstitions and Irish Fairylegends had interwoven themselves into his life or that he would unknowingly pass them on to his 8 children.  As every “good” Irishman did, James believed in Fairies. A lot of his superstitions were based on this belief. James was a farmer and he owned several hundred acres in Camden, Missouri.

Primrose

Primrose

He took pride in all the things he raised but he was especially proud of the Primrose bushes that he took excellent care of. Every first day of May, James would go outside early in the morning and collect the Primroses to spread around his doors and windows. This was done to keep out the malevolent fairies and to appease the Good People. This would ensure that the rest of the year his family would not be bothered by the fairies.

spilled salt

Dinnertime was always a busy time with 10 people around the table. Inevitably someone would bump the table and knock over the salt shaker. James would insist whoever spilled it would have to throw the spilled salt over their shoulder. They did this to give the fairies their share and to avoid mischief from the fairies.

fishingJames loved to go fishing, not just to put food on the table but for the peace and solitude that it gave. Remember he had 8 children! He was Superstitious about his fishing, believing it was very unlucky for someone to ask a man on his way to go fishing where he was going. Any time this happened to him he would turn back because he knew the question was an evil spell.

James out-lived his wife Lucy by 22 years. When he died in 1901 he left a small box to his son John Henry McGowan.old 4 leaf clover After the funeral, the family and friends gathered at John’s home for food and fellowship. John opened the box and pulled out an old folded piece of paper. Opening it he found 24 pressed 4 leaf shamrocks. His Uncle told him, “If you possess a four-leaf shamrock you will have good luck in gambling, good luck in racing, and witchcraft will have no power over you but, you must always carry it on you. You cannot give it away and you cannot show it to anyone.” These shamrocks had been brought to America by Francis and he had passed them on to James who in turn was now passing them on to John.

Here are some more Superstitions that my Mother had:

Itchy palmIf the palm of your right hand itches it means you will soon be getting money.

Making a wish within 5 minutes of getting out of bed on the first day of the month will come true.first of the month

walking with only one shoe onWalking with one shoe on & one shoe off will make you have some kind of leg or foot problem one day.

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

Come back on Tuesday for the next installment of “My Mothers Superstitions – Tales from the Dark Side.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Genealogy, Halloween, Ireland, McGowan, Story telling, Superstitions

Part 4: My Mother’s Grandmother was Superstitious –A Month of Tales from the Dark Side

part 4I thought I would spend this month leading up to Halloween telling stories of things that happened in not only my childhood, but in the lives of my Ancestors that helped form most of my Mothers superstition beliefs or were a result of her beliefs.  I will post a blog every Friday and Tuesday and I hope you will enjoy them and even get a laugh or two out of them.

My Mothers maternal Grandmother Asenath “Dolly” Walt was born February 27 1863 in Camden, Ray, Missouri.  Dolly was said to be a very superstitious woman. Anyone who visited her home knew that she did have what they considered unusual quirks.

ring of salt

It is said that Dolly was petrified of “demons”. She believed that at night they would creep around her home and try to gain access. She kept a large container of salt by both the front and back doors for when visitors came. Upon answering the door she would take a scoop of salt and place it across the doorway. If the person was not a “demon” they could cross over the salt with no problem. The salt would have kept out any non-human who wanted to enter. I guess she never thought that a “demon” would probably not come knocking on her door, he would just kick it open and come in!

tombstone from Machpelah

Machpelah Cemetery

Dolly’s fear of “demons” began at a young age. She had lived her entire life within the 16 mile radius between Camden and Lexington Missouri. Most of her relatives who had passed away were buried in Machpelah Cemetery in Lexington. Even as a young girl this cemetery was considered an old one as the first burial there was in 1839. When Dolly was about 6 years old her younger sister Naomi passed away at the age of 1. In those days visiting a cemetery, especially one that was so far away, was an all day event. This day was no exception. After the small service for Naomi the women went about laying out the picnic lunch for the mourners on the edge of the grounds.  Dolly and her other siblings were racing around, darting in and out of the SONY DSCnearby woods. Dolly, in an attempt to hide from the others ran out of the woods and hid behind a large Headstone. That is when she saw it! A large man/beast come out of a grave and began walking slowly towards her. She ran terrified, screaming, all the way across the cemetery and into her Mother’s arms. When Dolly calmed down enough to speak she told the adults what had happened. They tried to convince her that what she saw was the grave digger climbing out of the hole he had just dug. Try as they might no one could convince her that she hadn’t just seen a “demon”.

Asenath McGowan HSAfter this experience she refused to set foot in the Machpelah Cemetery. When her own daughter Ella (My Grandmother) died in 1921 she pleaded with her son-in-law not to bury her in Lexington and so Ella was buried in the Buckner Cemetery.  Dolly spent 61 years of her life afraid of the “demon” that came out of the grave and was convinced that he was out to get her. Upon her death on February 19, 1931 Dolly’s husband John McGowan had her buried in the Machpelah Cemetery.

Here are some more Superstitions that my Mother had:

If your nose itches you will soon be kissed by a fool.itchy nose

happy new yearIf your house is clean on New Year’s Eve you will have a clean house all year.

Walking over a grave pic

If you get a chill up your back or goose bumps, it means that someone is walking over your grave.

Do you or anyone in your family have a Superstition? I would love to hear about them.

Come back on Friday for the next installment of “My Mothers Superstitions  – Tales from the Dark Side.”

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Cemetery, Family History, Genealogy, Halloween, Story telling, Superstitions

What Does That Mean?

Question markWhile doing some research for a client I came across an occupation that I had never heard of. The man was listed as being a “burler”. A what? I am sure I could have come up with a few definitions of what I thought this occupation was but I would have been very wrong with all of them. So after a quick search on the internet I discovered that a “burler” was 1: one that removes loose threads, knots, and other imperfections from cloth 2: one that inspects rugs before the finishing process and mends minor imperfections in rugs. Honestly, I never would have guessed that!

It got me to thinking about some of the other odd names or expressions that we Genealogists come across during our research.  Some of them are actually quite funny. Why not have some fun with this? I will list 10 words we may come across that are not commonly known and you can choose one of the multi choice definitions. At the end you will find the correct answers and you can then tally up your score. Good luck!

1. “Jackalent”

a. A coat of mail

b. A foolish fellow

c. A figure outside old clocks on public buildings and strikes the clocks bell

2. “Twindles”

a. Twins

b. A tool used by a Wheelwright

c. A “sure cure” for constipation

3. “Grondy”

a. An African Storyteller

b. An English coin

c. A Grandmother

4. “Cowdy”

a. Someone who is afraid of something

b. A Cowboy who only herds cows

c. A small cow

5. “Busker”

a. Someone who husks corn

b. An entertainer who danced, sang or recited on streets or public places

c. A tool used by a tanner

6. “Stockinger”

a. A person who knits or weaves stockings

b. A tool used by a boot maker

c. A measure of weight

7. “Dilling”

a. A person who digs ditches

b. A baby born to older parents

c. A sailor

8. “Codman”

a. A dealer in Codfish

b. A chest maker

c. A lamplighter

9. “Acater”

a. An agreement to the terms named

b. A falconer

c. A caterer; a purveyor of goods

10. “Sheepbiter”

a. A petty thief

b. A person who enjoys mutton meat

c. A womanizer

Since this is for fun there is no grading system. I hope you enjoyed this and maybe even had a laugh or two. I think in a hundred years our Descendants will be having to look up some of our commonly used words and will probably get a kick out of the definitions also!

Answers: 1) b   2) a   3)c   4)c   5)b   6)a   7)b   8)a   9) c   10)a,b,c

I am a professional genealogist, writer, photographer, crafter, reader, wife, mother, and grandma. I have two books available on Amazon.com: Your Family History: Doing It Right the First Time and Planning Your Genealogy Research Trip. You can also connect with me via Facebook or Twitter.

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Filed under Ancestry, Family History, Genealogy, Hints, Quiz